What Happens to Body Fat When You Lose Weight

Nothing beats a successful weight-loss routine. As you see the numbers on the scale go lower, you’ll begin to notice a thinning around your face, belly, thighs, and other problem areas. With a significant loss, you’ll look and feel like a different person.

We know that weight loss is the result of your body burning fat, making your fat cells disappear. But when you “lose” the fat, where does it end up? You may have heard different ideas about where fat goes. However, it can’t be attributed to just one component. Usually, the vanishing of fat has three parts.

It’s Converted to Energy

You often hear weight loss referred to as fat burn. Although your body isn’t literally burning your fat cells, it is an effective way to describe the chemical reaction that occurs when your fat cells are converted into energy. Rather than relying on food to create energy, you’re relying on fat.

“When you lose weight, it’s essentially like you’re eating your own fat,” Louis Aronne, director of the Comprehensive Weight Control Center at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian, told The Washington Post.

This isn’t an appetizing way to look at fat burn, but it’s the reason that cutting calories is so effective. When you expend more energy than you consume, your body uses your fat stores, eliminating some of the cells.

Calorie-cutting and increased exercise is the best way to create this conversion, but you can increase it with the use of supplements. Ephedra, for example, is one of the best fat-burning supplements on the market. It’s been clinically proven to promote weight loss, provide more energy, and improve athletic performance.

Lipodrene Hardcore is another effective fat burner. The primary ingredient is ephedra, and it uses thermogenic and repartitioning agents to eviscerate fat cells …

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